How Does Thermal Imaging Scope Work?

Not everyone is cut out to be a daytime hunter. Some of us prefer the night sky looming over us as we set up base and prepare ourselves for thrill of the kill. Or perhaps some of us prefer sleeping in and have no need to wake up early in the morning for a hunt. Then there’s some of us who may not objectively have an issue with hunting during the day…but we can’t for health reasons (think eye sensitivity to the sun’s beams, or perhaps hypersensitive skin).

All of these reasons are perfectly fine; we all comes from different slices of life, after all! But you can’t just automatically leap into the life of night hunting with no clothes on, so to speak. There’s equipment that you’ll need in order to make sure your hunt goes off without a hitch. I’m talking primarily of some kind of tech that allows you to see in the dark, such as a night vision scope or thermal scope.

If you want my honest opinion, I think you should go for the route of thermal imaging!

Fascinating, What is Thermal Imaging?

Thermal imagery, also known as thermography, is the study of infrared images. It’s similar to night vision, though differs in a few aspects. While night vision collects wandering light particles in the area, thermal imaging collects radiation waves, such as infrared or UV, and wandering heat. And while night vision is mainly used for night time hunting or surveillance, thermography can be used in all sorts of fields, ranging from security, law enforcement, medical, archeological, and more.
Also, hunting.
Lots and lots of hunting.

Niiice, So How Does It Work?

So now that we know the difference between standard night vision and thermal imaging, we should talk about the means in which thermal technology is able to pick up images with such ease, even in the brightest of days. The way this magic comes to life is first through the special lens that is engineered to zone in on infrared radiation. Once the lens picks up on the infrared signal, it’s scanned by the len’s built-in heat detection hardware. Once the scan is complete, it creates a unique pattern known as a thermogram.

The thermogram is essentially the collection of heat data saved by the thermal tech. Once it’s created, its then converted into electrical impulses. Soon after, the impulses are transferred to the signal-processing unit, which is a circuit-board that converts the heat data into pixels which form the final picture. And once that final picture is formed, that’s when we get the famous Predator colors plastered onto our screen. Depending on the colors of the objects, it can determine the intensity rate of the infrared energy (hint, red usually means a high amount).

That’s pretty awesome, isn’t it? What makes thermography so much more interesting is when you think about all the different fields who make use of it. For example, thermal imaging is used in medical practice for the purpose of scanning over areas of the patient’s body. This is done to reveal areas of the body that may be at risk for illness or may already be afflicted with deadly forms of cancer. This is often used in human medicine AND animal medicine.

How awesome is thermal imaging?!